He is Coming!

Jesus is coming! He will visit this world again, but not as at his first advent, to be despised, scoffed at and hated, to have his head pierced with a crown of thorns, and have nails driven through his precious hands and feet. As they nailed him to the cross, what pain this holy sufferer must have endured. Yet his bodily suffering was little compared with the anguish of his spirit, while the burden of the sins of the whole world was upon him, which caused him to exclaim, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? For our sins the Son of God endured all this.

Jesus is coming! But not to be the meek suffering Teacher he once was. He then took upon himself our nature, and sympathized with all suffering mankind, listening to their tales of woe, and soothing their sufferings, healing their sicknesses, forgiving their sins, causing the sinking and fainting to hope. For doing others good the wicked Pharisees could not bear Jesus among them. His holy, self-denying life constantly reproved their covetous, unholy lives. And because the minds of many were turned to this new and blessed Teacher, and they believed he was the Son of God, the Pharisees feared that they should not receive so much honor, and they said he was not fit to live, and cried out, Away with him, crucify him, crucify him!

But while the Son of God was being wounded, bruised and smitten for our transgressions and sins, all Heaven was watching over the scene, and every harp was hushed in silence while the Beloved of the Father was suffering. He died on Calvary’s cross—Angels witnessed it. He was laid in Joseph’s new tomb, and a heavy stone was rolled at the door of the sepulchre, and a guard placed around it to watch the tomb. But myriads of angels, bright and strong, were watching over his resting place, and at the appointed time, one of them was commissioned to “go roll away the stone from the door of the sepulchre.” And what could those keepers do? Feeble men! A little before they might have laughed at, and derided the Saviour of the world, as he hung upon the cross; but now the presence of one angel from glory causes them to become “as dead men.” The tomb could hold Jesus no longer, and he arose from the dead and appeared to his sorrowing disciples, and comforts them. He remained with them forty days, to bless, cheer and strengthen them, and then was taken up into heaven—a cloud received the one they so much loved out of their sight. And as they stood gazing into heaven, as he was taken away from them, two men [angels] in white apparel stood by them and inquired why they stood gazing up into heaven. Said these angels, “This same Jesus which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven.” Precious, indeed, was this promise to those sorrowing disciples, that they should again see Jesus who was greatly beloved by them all. Precious also is this promise to every true follower of Christ. None who truly love Jesus will be sorry that he is coming again. And as they approach nearer to the coming of the Son of man, the true lovers of Jesus will look forward with joyous hope, and will seek to get all ready to behold him whom their souls loveth, who died to redeem them.

Jesus is coming! But not to listen to the woes of mankind, and to hear the guilty sinner confess his sins, and to speak pardon to him; for every one’s case will then be decided for life or death. Those who have lived in sin will remain sinners forever. Those who have confessed their sins to Jesus in the Sanctuary, have made him their friend and have loved his appearing, will have pardon written for all their sins, and they, having purified their souls “in obeying the truth,” will remain pure and holy forever.

Jesus is coming as he ascended into heaven, only with additional splendor. He is coming with the glory of his Father, and all the holy angels with him, to escort him on his way. Instead of the cruel crown of thorns to pierce his holy temples, a crown of dazzling glory will deck his sacred brow. He will not then appear, the man of sorrows and acquainted with grief; but his countenance will shine brighter than the noon-day sun. He will not wear a plain seamless coat, but a garment whiter than snow—of dazzling brightness.

Jesus is coming! But not to reign as a temporal prince. He will raise the righteous dead, change the living saints to a glorious immortality, and, with the saints, take the kingdom under the whole heaven. This kingdom will never end. Then those who have patiently waited for Jesus, will be made like him.

If one angel from heaven caused the Roman guard to fall as dead men, how can those who are unprepared, unholy, bear the sight and live, of seeing Jesus in the glory of his Father and ten thousand angels accompanying him. O how can sinners bear this sight! They will cry for rocks and mountains to fall on them, and hide them from the face of him that sitteth on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb.

Dear young reader, seek a thorough preparation to meet Jesus, that when he appears you may exclaim with joy, “Lo this is our God, we have waited for him, and he will save us.” Eternal life will then be yours, and you will be a partaker with Christ of his glory, ever to hear his glorious approving voice, and behold his lovely person.1White, Ellen G. “He Is Coming.” The Youth Instructor 1 Apr. 1854: n. pag. Print.

References   [ + ]

The Watchman

The Watchman

In a special sense Seventh-day Adventists have been set in the world as watchmen and light – bearers. To them has been entrusted the last warning for a perishing world. On them is shining wonderful light from the Word of God. They have been given a work of the most solemn import, – the proclamation of the first, second, and third angels’ messages. There is no other work of so great importance. They are to allow nothing else to absorb their attention. Evangelism, p. 119

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Words of Life

I do not consider your case hopeless; if I did my pen would not be tracing these lines.

— Ellen G. White, Testimonies For The Church, vol. 2, p. 562